Tiny Timmy Turd Tosser - Bill Schiffbauer

I have recently been working with Adobe Character Animator and have found it to be great fun to work with. I used it to animate the characters in my most recent animated short “Tiny Timmy Turd Tosser”. Its a short about certain types of people who just love to say mean things to others. They are usually small in every sense of the word, and love to throw their crappy comments around without a second thought. So, I made a short about it. 😀

The beauty of Adobe Character Animator is that it is really easy to bring your characters to life. All you need to do is draw or create your character in Photoshop or Illustrator, import the layers into Character Animator and you’re set! Oh, and you will need a good webcam. Once you get the hang of the naming system and hierarchy, you can make some pretty crazy stuff.

Two cool features that Character Animator has are voice recognition and facial tracking capabilities. You can actually map your face, voice and actions directly to your character while recording it …in real time! It can be friggen HILARIOUS sometimes. You could just imagine what I’ve made some characters say. ;P

How I used Character Animator for Tiny Timmy Turd Tosser – An Animated Short

For this project I didn’t sync the mouths in real time with my own mouth. I did however map the characters to my head and body movements, but used a pre-recorded audio track to sync up the mouths. The reason is I had previously recorded the vocals about ten years ago with my daughter because I really wanted to use a kid’s voice for the character of the little girl. So unless there’s a time machine or some magic spell that can make my daughter 11 years old again… which would be awesome… :'( … I had to go with what I had.

But anyway, here’s a brief summary of my process:

  1. For this project, everything was hand drawn and hand colored. I drew each body part separately so they could all be animated in either Character Animator or After Effects (see gallery).
  2. I then scanned all of those elements into Photoshop, cut them out and placed them in the correct layer hierarchy with a proper naming standard.
  3. Once I was satisfied with how the character parts were set up, I saved them as .PSD’s and imported them into Character Animator.
  4. After the individual character animations were finished in Character Animator, I exported them as a series of individual .PNG files so they would have transparent backgrounds and could easily be placed into any scene in After Effects.
  5. While in After Effects I placed the animated characters in their scenes, animated all secondary elements, made color corrections, general scene edits and timing. I then exported each scene as separate individual clips.
  6. Finally, I imported all of the clips into Adobe Premiere for the final adjustments, rendering and proper encoding.

Blow is the finished product.

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